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Roman Era

210 BC - The Conquest of Akragas

Organised by: 
PastActivity
Event date: 
Saturday, 6 May, 2017 to Sunday, 7 May, 2017
Kind of Event: 
for Public

Conference Review: EAA Vilnius – about archaeological tourism, visualization, experiment and reconstruction

Roeland Paardekooper (NL)
The European Association of Archaeologists held its annual conference of 2016 in Vilnius, Lithuania. About 1,500 participants attended a programme, with a similar number of papers, in over 100 sessions. About a dozen EXARC members attended; what follows here is a review of three sessions...

Conference Review: European Textile Forum 2015

Heather Hopkins (UK)
The European Textile Forum (Textilforum) was held between the 2nd and 9th November 2015, at the Laboratory for Experimental Archaeology (LEA) in Mayen, Germany. LEA kindly hosted the European Textile Forum as part of their inaugural event in 2012 and since then the Director Michael Herdick has invited the conference to return annually...

Archaeological routes and paths in northeast Slovenia – new opportunities for tourism

Nataša Kolar (SI)
Archaeological parks, routes and paths in Slovenia are becoming new cultural-tourist products/attractions which, due to their content, enable visitors to “travel” back to the most remote periods of time. These products/attractions were first created in order to preserve the archaeological heritage and to make visitors aware of the rich cultural heritage which can be found at a specific place.

Book Review: Recent publications: Experimental archaeology in the November 2015 issue of the Cambridge Archaeological Journal (Volume 25, Issue 4)

Giovanna Fregni (UK)
In the last quarter of the 1900s, John Coles (1979) and Peter Reynolds (1999) introduced the subject of experimental archaeology, which has gained significant momentumin the past few years. The discipline has become essential for reconstructing past technologies, in addition to supporting archaeological theory.

Book Review (German): From Rome to Las Vegas. Reconstructions of ancient Roman architecture by Anita Rieche

Wulf Hein (DE)
For more than 200 years ancient buildings have been reconstructed. Reasons for the reconstruction of Roman architecture in particular are many. People enjoy being surrounded by fully realised reconstructions of ancient ruins where they can be taught in a manner reflecting a museum-like academic rigour...

Tangible and Intangible Knowledge: the unique Contribution of Archaeological Open-Air Museums

Linda Hurcombe (UK)
OpenArch Special Digest 2015 Issue 2
***Over the years my personal research interests have focussed on the less tangible elements of the past, such as gender issues, perishable material culture, and the sensory worlds of the past, but all of these have been underpinned by a longstanding appreciation of the role experimental archaeology can play as...

Was it all worth it? Conference review: Archaeological reconstructions between science and event

Roeland Paardekooper (NL)
On the 3 February 1990, as the Iron Curtain dropped and the border between Bavaria and Bohemia opened, three archaeologists from both countries met. One year later they managed to get 27 participants together and soon the archaeological working group East Bavaria, West- and South Bohemia (and latter also Upper Austria) was a fact.

Book Review: Experimentelle Archäologie in Europa. Bilanz 2014

Christian Horn (DE)
Volume number 13 of the periodical Experimentelle Archäologie in Europa. Bilanz contains 215 pages with 18 different articles on a wide variety of subjects. The contributions are presented in four sections: Experiment and Test, Reconstruction Archaeology, Theory and Emanation’, and Short reports and Annual reports.

Mural Painting of a Roman Lady from Viminacium: From Roman Matron to the Modern Icon

Jelena Anđelković Grašar and
Milica Tapavički-Ilić (RS)
OpenArch Special Digest 2015 Issue 2
***During the late antiquity, fresco decorated tombs had a prominent place in funerary practice. All of the scenes and motifs within tombs are dedicated to the deceased persons and their apotheosis. Usually painted on the western wall of the tomb, these portraits could represent a deceased married couple or sometimes individuals...

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