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Palaeolithic

Book Review: The lifecycle of structures in experimental archaeology – An object Biography Approach by L. Hurcombe and P. Cunningham

Peter Bye-Jensen (UK)
This book is made up of 16 papers that are a collection of results from a European Culture Project (OpenArch) that ran from 2010-2015. It was edited by Linda Hurcombe and Penny Cunningham. This work is dedicated to the late shipwright Brian Cumby, who was deeply involved with making replicas of several prehistoric boats...

Conference Review: Reconstructive and Experimental Archaeology Conference (REARC), USA

Christopher Menke (US)
The 2016 REARC conference hosted by EXARC in Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia, from November 18th to the 20th, was an unforgettable experience. After a midnight drive and a short night's rest it was time to listen to papers. Everyone giving a presentation was incredibly knowledgeable and the passion they had for their topics was unprecedented...

Conference Review: EAA Vilnius – about archaeological tourism, visualization, experiment and reconstruction

Roeland Paardekooper (NL)
The European Association of Archaeologists held its annual conference of 2016 in Vilnius, Lithuania. About 1,500 participants attended a programme, with a similar number of papers, in over 100 sessions. About a dozen EXARC members attended; what follows here is a review of three sessions...

Archeofest 2016: among experimental archaeology, ethnography and scientific disclosure

Massimo Massussi and
Sonia Tucci (IT)
The Archeofest is an experimental archaeological festival designed by Paleoes - eXperimentalTech ArcheoDrome (EXTAD), a cultural association comprising of experimental archaeologists, anthropologists, experts of ancient technologies and their re-enactments, whose focus on making the archaeological knowledge more comprehensive to the public...

Book Review: Archaeology and Crafts edited by Rüdiger Kelm

Arati Deshpande-Mukherjee (IN) and
Doug Meyer (USA)
The book “Archaeology and Crafts” is a transcript of the proceedings of the VI OpenArch-Conference held in Albersdorf, Germany, on the 23-27 September 2013. The conference was an activity of the OpenArch project –a cooperation of Archaeological Open-Air Museums across Europe of which the AOZA...

Paleofestival: 10 years of spreading archaeology in evolution

Edoardo Ratti and
Donatella Alessi (IT)
At the age of thirty Edoardo started to study Archaeology for pleasure at the University of Genoa (Italy) while working as a computer programmer. Since then has taken part in archaeological excavations of prehistoric sites. Here he met many enthusiastic students, who dreamed of a future as prehistoric archaeologists in Italy, a country much more structured for classical archaeology...

Review: The Great Human Race by National Geographic

Roeland Paardekooper (NL)
National Geographic offers some of the most beautiful film material, of nature and culture, one can imagine. When I heard that Dr Bill Schindler would co-star together with Cat Bigney in a series recreating humankind’s ancestral journey, I was thrilled...

Book Review: Recent publications: Experimental archaeology in the November 2015 issue of the Cambridge Archaeological Journal (Volume 25, Issue 4)

Giovanna Fregni (UK)
In the last quarter of the 1900s, John Coles (1979) and Peter Reynolds (1999) introduced the subject of experimental archaeology, which has gained significant momentumin the past few years. The discipline has become essential for reconstructing past technologies, in addition to supporting archaeological theory.

Tangible and Intangible Knowledge: the unique Contribution of Archaeological Open-Air Museums

Linda Hurcombe (UK)
OpenArch Special Digest 2015 Issue 2
***Over the years my personal research interests have focussed on the less tangible elements of the past, such as gender issues, perishable material culture, and the sensory worlds of the past, but all of these have been underpinned by a longstanding appreciation of the role experimental archaeology can play as...

Interview: "The small things paint the big picture" with Harm Paulsen

Wulf Hein (DE)
I meet Harm Paulsen (70), the best known and longest working experimental archaeologist in Germany, in his apartment in Schleswig. Although the rooms aren't small, it is only possible to move around by holding in your belly and not breathing, as everywhere, standing, hanging or lying around, is evidence of Harm's professional and private life – a clear line between the two is not visible...

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