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Interpretation

What Does Your Visitor Experience? Making the Most of Live Interpretation in a Unique Setting.

Marc van Hasselt (NL)
OpenArch Special Digest 2015 Issue 2
***Archaeological Open-Air Museums (AOAM) offer a unique setting in which live interpretation can make history come truly alive. For many, or perhaps all, AOAM history is the product being sold to the public. During the five years the OpenArch project has run the partners have spent many hours discussing the merits of live interpretation in the unique setting of an AOAM.

Mural Painting of a Roman Lady from Viminacium: From Roman Matron to the Modern Icon

Jelena Anđelković Grašar and
Milica Tapavički-Ilić (RS)
OpenArch Special Digest 2015 Issue 2
***During the late antiquity, fresco decorated tombs had a prominent place in funerary practice. All of the scenes and motifs within tombs are dedicated to the deceased persons and their apotheosis. Usually painted on the western wall of the tomb, these portraits could represent a deceased married couple or sometimes individuals...

Historical European Martial Arts and Reenactment - Concept, Problems, Approaches in Our Experience

Gábor Fábián (HU)
2013 EXARC meeting at Csiki Pihenökert (HU)
***Throughout the history of re-enactment and in general efforts to revive or recreate the milieu of bygone ages, the military aspect of lifestyle has always enjoyed a special status-one might even say that the military stand point is a predominant part of many re-enactments...

Archaeological Live Interpretations, Docu-Soaps and Themed Walks: Similarities and Differences

S. Willner,
S. Samida,
G. Koch (DE)
2013 EXARC meeting at Csiki Pihenökert (HU)
***Since the 1990s, experience-oriented historical communication has been steadily increasing. Yet in-depth research of forms of historical representation and acquisition such as museum theatre, themed walks, or time travel within docu-soaps has remained minimal...

Interpreting the Interpreter: Is Live Historical Interpretation Theatre at National Museums and Historic Sites Theatre?

Ashlee Beattie (CDN)
2012 OpenArch meeting at Foteviken (SE)
***In his 2007 book, Living History Museums: Undoing History through Performance, Scott Magelssen describes the various reactions to his main line of enquiry: is historical interpretation theatre? The majority of the people he interviewed were museum curators and historical interpreters, and their answers were broken up into three main categories...

From Mead to Snakebite - An Ethnography of Modern British University Sports Team Drinking Culture and its Parallels with the Drinking Rituals of the Viking World

Matt Austin (UK)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***The idea for this paper came, as these things often do, in a bar. The interesting twist was that instead of being an inebriated patron, I was actually working behind the bar observing the scenes of intoxicated students with a bemused expression. What began as a joke...

“You could see it [the past] in your mind”: What impact might living history performance have on the historical consciousness of young people?

Ceri Jones (UK)
2012 OpenArch meeting at Foteviken (SE)
***Living history is used as part of a range of interpretive techniques to help young people experience and learn about the past at museums and historic sites (Samuel 1994). Although the benefits of bringing the past to life have been enthusiastically supported by costumed interpreters, museum and history educators (Fairley 1977; Turner-Bisset 2005) it was not until 2008 that...

A Playground Amongst Museums - The Bauspielplatz: From an Open-air Youth Centre to a History Experience Site - an Unusual Development

Frank Kock (DE)
Being a Bauspielplatz [adventure playground] usually means that children have a place to meet, play, be creative, get in contact with animals and nature and even do ‘dangerous’ things - with some pedagogical guidance. It is part of local social work, similar to a youth centre...

Crafting the Past: Theory and Practice of Museums

Katherine Ambry Linhein Muller (US)
How do we know something is real? We say something exists when it is tangible and we can touch it; it is factual when we can compare it to other known variables, and historic when it fulfils our expectation of the past. There are objects and activities that blur these categories and cause people to accept alternative histories...

Authenticity is Fiction? Relicts, Narration and Hermeneutics

Jörg van Norden (DE)
In many ways, authenticity is everybody’s darling: the historian searches for authentic, historic texts in order to write down history objectively; the readers, naturally, appreciate an authentic description of the past; and museum visitors want to see authentic originals, not replicas...

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