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Experimental Archaeology

Where Were the Viking Brew Houses?

Graham Dineley & Merryn Dineley (UK)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***The authors have over 15 years' experience in experimenting with recreating ancient and traditional techniques of making ale from malted grain. Graham is a craft brewer, with 30 years' experience making beer from the grain. Merryn is an archaeologist, with an interest in malting and brewing technologies...

Aspects on Realizing House Reconstructions: a Scandinavian Perspective

Ulf Näsman (DK)

1987 ESF Proceedings
The 1980s was the beginning of a boom in the construction of archaeologically inspired buildings inside and outside archaeological open-air museums.
***Experiments are an integrated part of archaeological research, a tool used to analyse and understand archaeological phenomena. It is a method as legitimate and as problematic as so many others...

A Picenian Warrior Who Lived in the Eight Century BC: A Hypothetical Reconstruction

Mauro Fiorentini (IT)
The Iron Age in Central Italy is a period that begins in the tenth century BC and ends as the Romans take control over other Italic populations. Italy is divided longitudinally by the Apennines and the definition of ‘Central Italy’ includes the actual regions of Lazio and Toscana to the west, Umbria in the middle, Marche and Abruzzo on the east side of the Apennines...

An Experimental Programme for the Collection and Use of Retouching Tools Made on Diaphyseal Bone Splinters

Millán Mozota Holgueras (ES)
The present work presents the results of 38 experiments of bone fragmentation and blank collection, together with 177 experiments of retouch. In the first series of experiments, the fragmentation step was executed by massive percussion using macro-lithic tools...

Testing a Reconstruction: A Frosty Week in a Viking Age House

K. Paavel,
V. Pajuste,
R. Rootslane (EE)
In the summers of 2010 and 2011, an archaeologically inspired Viking Age horizontal log house with a two-layer split plank roof, clay floor and a dry-stone stove without a chimney was built in Rõuge, Estonia. In the winter of 2012 (30 January 2012 - 05 February 2012) a one-week living-experiment was organised to test the building...

The Production of High Carbon Steel Directly in Bloomery Process: Theoretical Bases and Metallographic Analyses of the Experiments Results

Adrian Wrona (PL)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***The series of experiment on iron smelting conducted by author in 2012 resulted in very good quality high carbon steel produced directly in the bloomery furnace. Bearing in mind the unusual mechanism of carburization in a 'Aristotle furnace', a question arose concerning possibility of...

Fire and Bone: An Experimental Study of Cremation

C. Snoeck,
R. J. Schulting (UK)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***Many bone fragments have been burned in controlled laboratory conditions but few have been burned on outdoor pyres. In order to study and understand cremated bone, it is crucial to conduct experiments in real environmental conditions. In this study several cremations were carried out outdoors using ‘old’ fuels...

Let’s Build a Medieval Tile Kiln - Introducing Experimental Archaeology into the University Curriculum

Gaynor Wood (UK)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***As a lecturer at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN) I teach a course on medieval archaeology and run a successful programme in designing exhibitions for local museums and community groups. I also encourage my students to take part in the community archaeology and history projects that I run with archaeological and historical local groups in Preston...

Lithic Experiments in Rescue Archaeology: a Case from Southern Norway

S.V. Nielsen,
J. Åkerstrøm,
T. Vihovde (NO)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***During the fall of 2012, the authors participated in a Stone Age survey conducted in Aust-Agder County where several prehistoric sites were discovered (Eskeland forthcoming). Both shoreline displacement, relative dating of the lithic assemblage and radiocarbon dating of organic material placed the sites in either a Mesolithic or Neolithic context...

Experimental Lime Burning Based on the Findings from the Roman Empire Period

Richard Thér,
David Maršálek (CZ)

In 2006 the remains of two lime kilns from the Roman Empire period were discovered in Tuněchody near Chrudim in the Czech Republic. These finds became the object of a detailed multidisciplinary research project resulting in hypotheses on the use of the kilns. Based on these hypotheses experimental research was designed (Thér et al. 2010)...

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