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Experimental Archaeology

Experiencing Visible and Invisible Metal Casting Techniques in the Bronze Age Italy

M. Barbieri,
C. Cavazzuti,
L. Pellegrini and
F. Scacchetti (IT)
OpenArch Dialogue with Skills Issue
***What we know about Bronze Age metalworking in Italy basically relies on finished artefacts and on stone, clay or bronze implements involved in the process of manufacturing (tuyères, crucibles, moulds, hammers, chisels, et cetera; Bianchi, 2010; Bianchi, in press).

Field Trials in Neolithic Woodworking – (Re)Learning to Use Early Neolithic Stone Adzes

R. Elburg,
W. Hein,
A. Probst and
P. Walter (DE)
OpenArch Dialogue with Skills Issue
***Excavations of several Early Neolithic wells with excellent preservation of the wooden lining in the past years have made clear that Stone Age woodworking already attained a very high level of perfection. This poses the question how it was possible to execute this type of work with the means available at that time...

The Iron Age Iberian Experimental Pottery Kiln of Verdú, Catalonia, Spain

Ramon Cardona Colell* et allii (CAT)
The goal of this project is to reconstruct the operational sequence of manufacture of Iberian Iron Age pottery, from clay procurement to firing in a reconstructed kiln. Although pottery is the most characteristic artefact recovered on Iberian Iron Age excavations, most of its complex processes and production techniques remain poorly known...

An Experimental Comparison of Impressions Made From Replicated Neolithic Linen and Bronze Age Woollen Textiles on Pottery

Lauren Ferrero (UK)
Textile impressions on pottery provide evidence for fabrics and weaves in areas where the fabrics themselves do not survive. This article argues that the impressions can provide information on the uses of different fibres, the weaving technologies and possible trading or agricultural advances connected with these fibres...

The Prometheus Project

Ryan Watts (UK)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***The Prometheus Project was an experimental archaeological investigation carried out at Butser Ancient Farm, Hampshire, England, into prehistoric logboat building techniques. The project focused on exploring the use of fire in building logboats...

Reinventing the Egyptian Pulley

Stephen Blakely and
Gregory Blakely (US)
8th UK EA Conference Oxford 2014
***The Egyptian pulley incorporates several novel, useful features. The design involves only significant compressive loading of its two components. The materials of construction are high compressive strength materials...

Investigating the Influence of the Kettle Material on Dyeing in the Industry of Pompeii

K. Kania,
H. Hopkins,
S. Ringenberg
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***Dyeing, especially in bright, intense colours, has been one of the methods used to embellish textiles and add to their value. A considerable dyeing industry can be shown to have existed in Pompeii. The city of Pompeii was destroyed in a volcanic eruption in AD 79, but its remains were preserved in situ...

An Experimental Approach to Studying the Technology of Pottery Decoration

Golnaz Hossein Mardi (CA)
8th UK EA Conference Oxford 2014
***The early Middle Chalcolithic pottery tradition of Seh Gabi Tepe in Iran is called Dalma tradition. Among the different types of Dalma pottery, I have focused on monochrome painted ceramics, to investigate, by means of experimental analysis, how their decoration technology was undertaken...

Stone Tools of Shetland: Experimental Felsite Project

B. O’Neill,
B. Gilhooly and
G. Cooney (IE)
8th UK EA Conference Oxford 2014
***The Shetland Islands are the northernmost part of Britain, located northeast of the Orkney Islands and Scottish mainland. Similar to other locations in northwest Europe, during the Neolithic Period (4000-2500 cal BC) suitable lithic sources were exploited for use in the production of stone axes and other artefacts...

To Use or Not to Use a Minoan Chisel? Ancient Technology in a New Light

Maria Lowe Fri (SE)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***The Minoan chisel is thought to have been used by the metal worker, the stone mason, the sculptor, the carpenter, and the ivory and bone worker. However, barely any work has been conducted to substantiate the different workers and their chisels...

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