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Archaeological Open-Air Museum

Access to Cultural Heritage Sites for All

Linda Nilsen Ask (NO)
The purpose of Universal Design is to increase people’s opportunities to participate in society through the design of products, services, methods of communication, buildings and built-up spaces that are accessible to as many as possible. Many will suffer from some form of disability at some time in life, either temporarily or long-term...

From Celtic Village to Iron Age farmstead: lessons learnt from twenty years of building, maintaining and presenting Iron Age roundhouses at St Fagans National History Museum

Steve Burrow (WAL)
OpenArch Special Digest 2015 Issue 2
***This article summarises the main issues that were faced in running a group of reconstructed Iron Age roundhouses as an educational and visitor resource at St Fagans National History Museum from 1992 until 2013. Plans to build a new Iron Age farmstead at St Fagans are then outlined along with the steps that will be taken to learn from...

Tangible and Intangible Knowledge: the unique Contribution of Archaeological Open-Air Museums

Linda Hurcombe (UK)
OpenArch Special Digest 2015 Issue 2
***Over the years my personal research interests have focussed on the less tangible elements of the past, such as gender issues, perishable material culture, and the sensory worlds of the past, but all of these have been underpinned by a longstanding appreciation of the role experimental archaeology can play as...

Montale, the Terramara Lives

Andrea Cardarelli,
Ilaria Pulini and
Cristiana Zanasi (IT)
OpenArch Special Digest 2015 Issue 2
***Ten years ago, the results of investigations from one of the most important protohistoric settlements of the Po Plain in Italy lead to the construction of a large archaeological park. A project which, today, represents a core reality in the dissemination of experimentations...

The Steinzeitpark Dithmarschen (DE): Concept and Development of a Visitor Oriented Educational Centre for Sustainable Development

Rüdiger Kelm (DE)
OpenArch Special Digest 2015 Issue 2
***What does a Stone Age village or Stone Age house look like? (Almost) every person that we happen to randomly meet can answer this question with (subjectively recognized) certainty. Since the research of the 19th century, the knowledge people assume to have is based, not lastly, on images or ‘projections’...

People Want Quality and They are Willing to Pay for it

Henrik Zipsane (SE)
The international and European notion of cultural and creative industries has not shown much appreciation of the potential of the cultural sector, especially the heritage sector. This may or may not be fair, but the perspective in the conclusions from KEA studies on cultural economy and creativity has been symptomatic for the European approach (KEA 2006; 2009)...

Gene Fornby - The Ancient Village of Gene

Carl L. Thunberg (SE)
The open-air museum Gene Fornby (The Ancient Village of Gene - author’s translation) is an archaeological reconstruction completed in 1991 that is based on the excavation of a nearby ancient settlement dated mainly to the Roman Iron Age and the Migration Period. For many years now, the politicians of the City Council of Örnsköldsvik have been debating on the ‘use’ of Gene Fornby...

Archaeological Open-Air Museums in the Netherlands, a bit of History

Roeland Paardekooper (NL)
This article is a result of my interest in, and experience with, archaeological open-air museums. With the start of HOME Eindhoven in 1982, I became actively involved in these museums and I was one of the people involved from the first moment in EXARC. From 2005 onward, I have been conducting postgraduate research at the University of Exeter into archaeological open-air museums...

Butser Ancient Farm

Maureen Page (UK)

Nestled among the rolling hills of the South Downs National Park, Butser Ancient Farm in Chalton has been an archaeological research site since 1972. The farm was originally set up on Little Butser, a spur of Butser Hill. It was established with support from the Council for British Archaeology...

Roseldorf rekonstruiert

Jan Olofsson (SE)

This review concerns the article "Roseldorf rekonstruiert – Ein keltischen Heiligtums entsteht in Asparn an der Zaya" published in EuroREA 6/2009.
Left - a photo of the idol of Cernunnos placed inside the temple... But does he recognise his surroundings?

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