Welcome

One of EXARCs most important assets is the EXARC JOURNAL. 
It has four peer-reviewed sections covering EXPERIMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY, ARCHAEOLOGICAL OPEN-AIR MUSEUM, ANCIENT TECHNOLOGY and INTERPRETATION.
While the archive of older articles is open to the public, articles published in the past 2 years are available (and visible on the website) only to EXARC Members. Please Become a Member in order to view them.

The fifth section of the EXARC Journal is open access and is called MIXED MATTERS. It contains book reviews, reports from conferences and events, interviews with personalities from the world of experimental archaeology and portraits of archaeological open-air museums. This section will be regularly updated to bring you topical news.

Last added articles

Interpreting the Interpreter: Is Live Historical Interpretation Theatre at National Museums and Historic Sites Theatre?

Ashlee Beattie (CDN)
2012 OpenArch meeting at Foteviken (SE)
***In his 2007 book, Living History Museums: Undoing History through Performance, Scott Magelssen describes the various reactions to his main line of enquiry: is historical interpretation theatre? The majority of the people he interviewed were museum curators and historical interpreters, and their answers were broken up into three main categories...

Book Review: Communication Strategy–Strategic Public Relations for Archaeological Open-Air Museums by M.A. Zielinska and R.P. Paardekooper

Rikke Olafson (DK)
How a museum communicates to its audience has changed significantly in the past decades. With the introduction of the Internet and the creation of social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, social media has become an integrated part of the everyday life of the majority of museum visitors...

Book Review: An Early Meal - a Viking Age Cookbook & Culinary Odyssey by Daniel Serra and Hanna Tunberg

Laura Kelley (US)
The Vikings recorded many things, from The Sagas to business transactions and personal letters. But beyond a brief and occasional mention, two of the many things they didn’t write about were what they ate and how they prepared their meals. The Vikings left no recipes...

Book Review: Journal Of of Archaeological And and Anthropological Sciences by L. Shillito, E. Fairnell and H. S. Williams (ed)

Katy Whitaker (UK)
A set of eleven articles resulting from the call for papers for the Sixth UK Experimental Archaeology Conference (held in York in January 2012) is now published in a special issue of the Journal of Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences...

Review of the 1st Bloomery Seminar, Starachowice 2013

A. Przychodni,
A. Wrona (PL)
The Bloomery Seminar, held on the 5 - 6 October 2013 at the Museum of Nature and Technology in Starachowice, was organised to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the birth of Professor Wacław Różański. During the event two experiments were conducted, one of which was fully traced and discussed with the smelters who carried out the process...

8th Experimental Archaeology Conference, Oxford

Giovanna Fregni (UK)
The conference unofficially began in the Royal Blenheim pub at 6 pm on Thursday evening. Conference staff and attendees filtered in throughout the evening eventually filling the back room. The pub had excellent food and a good variety of local ales. Those who managed to brave the flooding introduced themselves and got to know other attendees. It was a nice way to start the conference...

Reconstructing a Prehistoric Fish Trap

E. IJsveld (NL)
OpenArch Dialogue with Skills Issue
***Fish traps, still in use all over the world today for catching fish and crustaceans, have been used by mankind at least since the Mesolithic period. Their shape at that time is quite well-established, suggesting that they may have originated even earlier. This type of fish trap is made up of two elements...

Reproducing the Wall Painting of the Abduction of Persephone (Vergina-Macedonia): Conditions and Restrictions for a Successful Archaeological Experiment

Μ.Ι. Stefanakis,
Α. Vlavogilakis (GR)
Research on the technique of fresco painting in Macedonian tombs of the late classical period, is currently in progress through the experimental reproduction of the mural the Tomb of Persephone in the Grand Tumulus of Vergina. The purpose of the research is to identify the techniques used by ancient craftspeople, their tools, materials and ...

From Mead to Snakebite - An Ethnography of Modern British University Sports Team Drinking Culture and its Parallels with the Drinking Rituals of the Viking World

Matt Austin (UK)
7th UK EA Conference Cardiff 2013
***The idea for this paper came, as these things often do, in a bar. The interesting twist was that instead of being an inebriated patron, I was actually working behind the bar observing the scenes of intoxicated students with a bemused expression. What began as a joke...

Variables and Assumptions in Modern Interpretation of Ancient Spinning Technique and Technology Through Archaeological Experimentation

Tracy P. Hudson (QA)
This paper takes the form of a critical analysis of archaeological experiments using spinning tools. The archaeological experiments regarding whorl weight and wool spinning of the Tools and Textiles – Texts and Contexts project, through the Danish National Research Foundation’s Centre for Textile Research, are examined with respect to a number of variables...

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